Science scheme expected to spur innovation

Young Scientists Kenya (YSK) is a unique platform in East Africa aimed at encouraging secondary school students to demonstrate their innovation and showcase their scientific talents and STEM pathways. It is based on the premise that a wealth of talent and potential for innovation exists in Kenya. Modeled on the internationally acclaimed British Telecom Young Scientists and Technology Exhibition (BTYSTE) in Ireland and local science fairs such as Kenya Science and Engineering Fair, Young Scientists Kenya will help to popularize science and technology amongst young people and encourage them to develop projects that seek practical solutions to the everyday problems we face within society.

 

It is hoped that sustained support for this project will result in the active engagement of young Kenyans in the search for practical solutions to the problems that hinder development. A wealth of talent and potential for innovation exists in Kenya. All we need to do is give Kenyan students the opportunity to develop their skills and embrace science as a vital discipline in the development of their society, environment and economy.

 

The exhibition

The centerpiece of YSK is the annual exhibition and competition in which schools and students throughout Kenya can participate.

 

Schools and teachers who wish to get involved are supported through cross regional workshops where they receive practical advice on experimental methods suitable for their environment. Students then generate ideas for their projects based on the realities faced in their communities, tackling topics as wide ranging as nutrition, climate change, sustainable agriculture, gender inequality, disease, clean water and sustainable energy, all of which have major implications for the development of the Kenya economy and society.

 

In the process of their research, students and schools are also linked up with appropriate mentors from academia, the government, development and private sectors, and encouraged to view their research in the context of the global scientific community.